About THE CEMETERY

A once remote location the Symonds Street Cemetery was established in 1842, when Auckland was the capital of New Zealand, with a population of 2000. At that time the area was out beyond the town limits, and the location was considered appropriate for a cemetery because of the wide, sweeping views. Land was set aside for burials from 1842, with each religion given a seperate area. To the east of Symonds Street facing towards the harbour were the Anglican and Weslyan burial grounds. To the west of Symonds Street were the Jewish, Presbyterian and Roman Catholic areas. In 1905 the Cemetery was closed and given to Auckland City Council as a public park.

Symonds Street Cemetery is a historic cemetery and park in central Auckland, New Zealand. It is in 5.8 hectares of deciduous forest on the western slope of Grafton Gully, by the corner of Symonds Street and Karangahape Road, and is crossed by the Grafton Bridge. The street (and by extension the Cemetery) are named for William Cornwallis Symonds- a British Army officer prominent in the early colonisation of New Zealand. It has a Historic Place Category I listing in the New Zealand Historic Places Trust. Maintenance and administration of the Cemetery is provided by the Auckland Council.

Methodist or General area looking north. When Grafton Bridge was constructed in 1908 to 1910 it was placed so it was directly opposite the route of Karangahape Road to the West. As it happened that placed it almost directly on the border betwee the General Area to the north and the Anglian area to the south. Note the yellow Lichen on the oak tree to the right.

Methodist or General area looking north. When Grafton Bridge was constructed in 1908 to 1910 it was placed so it was directly opposite the route of Karangahape Road to the West. As it happened that placed it almost directly on the border betwee the General Area to the north and the Anglian area to the south. Note the yellow Lichen on the oak tree to the right.